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Hara-eternity, Haya-Mother Goddess and Ara (rich) – the Creator and other foreign offsprings

April 14, 2017

“Trinity” of Metsamor. Sky-triangle-cosmic mountain (associate.Anu), to the right - ” the symbol of four winds” (associate. Enlil), to the left- ”Է’’(E) ideology (Ea. 3ht millen. BC).

“Trinity” of Metsamor.
Sky-triangle-cosmic mountain (associate.Anu), to the
right – ” the symbol of four winds” (associate. Enlil),
to the left- ”Է’’(E) ideology (Ea. 3ht millen. BC).

There is no difference between Armenian Է (é) and ʾĒl (written aleph-lamed, e.g. Ugaritic: 𐎛𐎍, Phoenician: 𐤋𐤀, Classical Syriac: ܐܠ, Hebrew: אל, Arabic: إل or إله, cognate to Akkadian: ilu) Northwest Semitic word meaning “deity”. El or Il was a god also known as the Father of humankind and all creatures. In Northwest Semitic usage El was both a generic word for any “god” and the special name or title of a particular God who was distinguished from other gods as being “the god”, or in the monotheistic sense, God. El is listed at the head of many pantheons. El is the Father God among the Canaanites.

About Armenian Է (é) check my the article here in my blog “Sacred Letter Է as a Divine Essence”  https://narinnamkn.wordpress.com/2013/10/21/sacred-letter-%D5%A7-as-a-divine-essence/

Armenian Է (é)  corresponds with the Armenian God AR-ARA also had enough offsprings, such as

Mesopotamian – Erra,
in Hittite – Iarri- Yarri,
in Egyptian Ra,
Er the son of Platons hero Armenos,
Persian Arash,
Greek Ares,
Slavonic Yarilo son God and others.

Actually, it goes to Hara (Haya) – Mother Goddess. It became masculine after the maternity was replaced by the paternity. But even before the matriarchal societies Hara meant “Eternity”, Har means eternal in Armenian.

There is no doubt that we are dealing with phenomenon called “cultural diffusion” and variational conjugations and in this peculiar case also the ancient Indo-European  but also semitic attribution. And in both cases the  roots go to Armenian people.

According to a number of scholars, Ar, was a shorter version of Ara or Arar(ich), Creator. The worship of Ar was wide spread amongst early Armenians who worshipped this deity and simply called him the Creator (Ara or Ararich).

 

In colloquial Armenian, the name “Ara” also became synonymous with the word “man” (especially a male), and Armenian men still informally address each other (with the self-designative name) “Ara,” after the name of the Creator God – Ar(a).

By the way,  in Urdu there  is  a word ” Araish ” which means decoration and they used the word “Ara” as a part of a female name like “Jahan Ara ” it means , decorator of the world.

In ancient Persia they say to the children of the sun  – Armahniah.

In all possible sources it is mentioned that semitic people took it from the Punics and the Phoenicians !!! And who are now the descedents of the Phoenicians? How the ancient Middle East flowed into Northern India? The question that peaks my interest is rather smaller in scope—namely, whether the Hittites and proto-Phoenicians, at one time, among some other Armenian tribes, were  A SINGLE PEOPLE … or, rather, two different tribes of A LARGE UMBRELA GROUP – Armenian group.

This has a lot to do with the origin of the names of Armenian, Assyrian and Roman Empires. The God Ar ( or Ara) : —- It has been shown by some Orientalists-Armenologists  in a number of quotations of mythological and historical date that the native people of the Armenian Highland and the neighboring regions of what is now Asia Minor (it is part of Armenian highland) had, in the earlier periods of paganism, a deity whom they called Ar or Ara.

In the primitive hunting stage of the life of these natives, the god Ara possessed animal –vegetal characteristics. Later, with the beginning of agriculture, he acquired vegetal-solar nature and with the development of irrigation in agriculture and the consolidation of statehood, he became a great war-god and was identified with the sun.

This process of change from primitive to complex characteristics, as manifested in the nature of Ar (or Ara), is by no means unique in the mythological history of mankind. It has had its close parallels. For example, the god Assur, in the earlier periods of the founding of the city of Assur, had a vegetal (peaceful) nature, but later on, when Assyria become a mighty empire by bloody expeditions, it turned into a fearsome deity and was identified with the sun.

Research has revealed that in the remote past Ar (or Ara) was the principal national deity of the Armen people.

…The known Orientalist A.H. Sayce states that Ar was the sun-god of the Armenians. In his words: “…it is better to suppose that Er, or Ara, was an Armenian name for the Sun-god, which in later times was confounded with Arios (Nergal) or Ktesias.”

In this connection H.Matikain writes: “To study Ara the Beautiful means to make inroads into the obscure centuries of the origin of the Armenian people and to examine them.” We do not think it is necessary here to delve further into the nature of Ara, because we have already treated this topic at great length in our previous works and have shown with numerous evidence that Ara was the native and national deity of the Armenians. However, because of the importance it bears upon the subject under study, we think it will be helpful to mention here some facts related to the formation and the meaning of the national name Armani and Armenians which is closely linked to Ara.

It is known in historiography and archaeology that the name of many ancient peoples have been related to the names of their principal deities.

Ardini (Armenian)/ Musasir (Assyrian) – The Holy City of Haldi The Armenian sources of the first millennium BC (Kingdom of Van) use the traditional name Ardini, AR (Creator) DI (God) NI (Place). a designation already in evidence before 2000 BC during the reign of Sulgi of Ur. But the very same ancient settlement, as the Araratian bilingual inscriptions show, was known to the Assyrians from at least the 9th century BC onwards as ‘Musasir’: the earliest reference is found in the so-called Banquet Stele of Assurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) where delegates from Musasir are listed among the foreign dignitaries attending the inauguration festivities at the new royal residence city Kalhu. The Assyrian name ‘Musasir’ must be derived from the region’s designation as ‘Musru’ in the late second millennium which we encounter most clearly in the inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser I (1114-1076 BC): The god Assur, my lord, commanded me to conquer KUR.Mu-us-ri and I took the way between Mounts KUR.Ela- mu-ni, KUR.Ta-la and KUR.Ha-ru-sa. I conquered KUR.Mu-uÒ-ri in its entirety and slew their warriors. I burned, razed and destroyed their settlements. The troops of KUR.Qu-ma-né-e came to the aid of KUR.Mu-uÒ-ri. I fought with them in the mountains (and) I brought about their defeat. I confined them to just one city, URU.A-ri-ni which is at the foot of Mount KUR.A-i-sa. They submitted to me (and) I spared that city. I imposed upon them hostages, tax duties and tribute. The city of URU.Ari-ni sa GÌR KUR.A-i-sa can certainly be identified with the Armenian Araratian Ardini and the Neo-Assyrian Musasir. Based on researches by Salvini 1993-1997: 445. A-rí-nu-um.KI in Bryn Mawr College no. 2 l. 17, Grayson 1991: The reading follows Fales 2003: 136-138 but note that he suggests to interpret bs/z‘tr as a personal name. With Postgate 1995:

Ardini (Armenian)/ Musasir (Assyrian) – The Holy City of Haldi
The Armenian sources of the first millennium BC (Kingdom of Van) use the traditional name Ardini, AR (Creator) DI (God) NI (Place). a designation already in evidence before 2000 BC during the reign of Sulgi of Ur. But the very same ancient settlement, as the Araratian bilingual inscriptions show, was known to the Assyrians from at least the 9th century BC onwards as ‘Musasir’: the earliest reference is found in the so-called Banquet
Stele of Assurnasirpal II (883-859 BC) where delegates from Musasir are listed among the foreign dignitaries
attending the inauguration festivities at the new royal residence city Kalhu.
The Assyrian name ‘Musasir’ must be derived from the region’s designation as ‘Musru’ in the late second millennium which we encounter most clearly in the inscriptions of Tiglath-pileser I (1114-1076 BC):
The god Assur, my lord, commanded me to conquer KUR.Mu-us-ri and I took the way between Mounts KUR.Ela- mu-ni, KUR.Ta-la and KUR.Ha-ru-sa. I conquered KUR.Mu-uÒ-ri in its entirety and slew their warriors. I burned, razed and destroyed their settlements. The troops of KUR.Qu-ma-né-e came to the aid of KUR.Mu-uÒ-ri. I fought with them in the mountains (and) I brought about their defeat. I confined them to just one city, URU.A-ri-ni which is at the foot of Mount KUR.A-i-sa. They submitted to me (and) I spared that city. I imposed upon them
hostages, tax duties and tribute.
The city of URU.Ari-ni sa GÌR KUR.A-i-sa can certainly be identified with the Armenian Araratian Ardini and the Neo-Assyrian Musasir.
Based on researches by
Salvini 1993-1997: 445.
A-rí-nu-um.KI in Bryn Mawr College no. 2 l. 17,
Grayson 1991:
The reading follows Fales 2003: 136-138 but note that he suggests to interpret bs/z‘tr as a personal name.
With Postgate 1995:

In the remote past each tribe, even each household, had its own totem, its object of worship, or its god. With the increasing of the household or the tribe in size and in strength, its god has correspondingly acquired greater significance and power. We learn from cuneiform inscriptions that battles waged between tribes and states have been fought mostly for and in the name of the gods of the fighting sides. In many cases tribes and states were distinguished from each other by the names of the gods. In the same way have originated also the name of many habitations and countries.

Because of intertribal wars, a given tribe was forced to fortify a central area on its territory where it kept its sacred totem in safety or established the throne (or the temple) of its god, from whom that particular place derived, subsequently, its name. Later on, as the tribe has grown and spread out, that fortified habitation has become an administrative and economic center, and still later the capital.

Very often we read in cuneiform writings that a certain king has defeated the king of the land of certain city. We have seen statements of this kind in the well-known Hittite inscription about Naram-Sin, where among his 17 enemies there is one mentioned as “Madatina, the king of the land of the city of Armani.” This shows clearly that the country of a tribe or a state could have derived its name from the name of its central or royal city, which, in many cases, bore the name of the principal god of that particular tribe or people.

Here we see the oldest of the temples Ararat which, according to reliable sources, was built around 825 BC in the city of Musasir, which can be located with some certainty in the area between lakes Van and Urmia, in Historic Armenia.(4) It depicts the pillaging of this temple erected to the warrior God Haldi by the soldiers of Sargon's army, but our concern at this moment is not in robbery but in artistry. Notice the pitched or gabled roof of either wood or stone, the vertical triangular end from eaves to ridge of roof with a high pediment. The portico or facade has six columns or piers or pilasters, if you will. The effect is definitely like a Greek temple similar to the Partheonon in Athens with which everyone is familiar. That Greek edifice was built around the year 500 BC or 425 years later than the Armenian temple of our Araratian forefathers. By Mark A. Kalustian 1990, Scientific American, Inc

Here we see the oldest of the temples Ararat which, according to reliable sources, was built around 825 BC in the city of Musasir, which can be located with some certainty in the area between lakes Van and Urmia, in Historic Armenia.(4)
It depicts the pillaging of this temple erected to the warrior God Haldi by the soldiers of Sargon’s army, but our concern at this moment is not in robbery but in artistry. Notice the pitched or gabled roof of either wood or stone, the vertical triangular end from eaves to ridge of roof with a high pediment. The portico or facade has six columns or piers or pilasters, if you will. The effect is definitely like a Greek temple similar to the Partheonon in Athens with which everyone is familiar. That Greek edifice was built around the year 500 BC or 425 years later than the Armenian temple of our Araratian forefathers.
By Mark A. Kalustian
1990, Scientific American, Inc

This is how have originated, for example, the names of the great Assyrian and Roman empires, which were originally the name of the central cities, Assur and Rome, of the given tribes, and where each tribe had established own object of worship, Assur and Romulus, respectively. The same is true also about the Greeks who call themselves Hellenes and their country Hellada (Hellas) after the name of their god Hellenos.

Dr. H. Martkian writes: “The history of each nation has begun with a mythological worldview… An Armenian history should never lose sight of this point; herein lies the Gordian knot of our history.” And Dr. G. Conteneau has this to say: “In remote antiquity no difference was made between a country and its gods.” In view of all these considerations, one would expect that the name Armani or Armeni that represents one of the most ancient peoples and the tribal unions of Western Asia should have been derived from the name of the principal deity of that tribe or people. And indeed, as we have seen, the name of that principal national deity was Ar or Ara.

Ḫaldi (also anglicized as Khaldi) was one of the three chief deities of Armenian Ararat Kingdom (Van, Urartu). His shrine was at Ardini. ARDINI -AR (Creator) DI (God) NI (Place). The Place of God AR. ARDINI - INDRA = Mirror images. AR - RA. RIG - GIR.. Art by Robert Hazarapetyan

Ḫaldi (also anglicized as Khaldi) was one of the three chief deities of Armenian Ararat Kingdom (Van, Urartu). His shrine was at Ardini.
ARDINI -AR (Creator) DI (God) NI (Place). The Place of God AR. ARDINI – INDRA = Mirror images. AR – RA. RIG – GIR..
Art by Robert Hazarapetyan

The coins left in ancient Briton by Phoenician mariners with the name “ Catti ” imprinted on them. Likewise,and “the Phoenicians usually spelt their tribal name of ‘ Khatti ‘ or ‘ Catti ‘ or ‘Gad,’ and were in the habit not infrequently of calling their rivers at their settlements ‘ Gadi,’ ‘Gad- es ‘ or ‘ Ka-desh ‘.”

Historians have long known that the Spanish city Cadiz was once a Phoenician colony called “ Gades ”. In Scotland, a river named by the Phoenicians is likewise known as the “ Gadie ”.

Could these variants of “ Catti ” be derived from the “ Khatti ” whence we get the term “Hittite”?

What we know about Hittites and their connection with the Armenians is the followings:

1. In his books, Explorations in Bible Lands During the 19th Century and The Hittites, German-American Assyriologist and archaeologist Hermann Volrath Hilprecht asserts that the Hittites indeed spoke Armenian.

2. The Hittite Aryans that became more powerful than the Armenians by 1500 BC were close neighbors and racial cousins of the Armenians, at times clashing with them and at times co-existing, yet probably gaining from the interaction at all times.

310094_10151471442708043_1010934307_n

Ashok Malhotra (India)

3. “The Hittites, Luwians, Phrygians and the people of Hayasa, with whom the Armenians are associated, spoke Indo-European languages “The Kingdom of Armenia – Page 265 by Mack Chahin.

4. In the Solution to the Hittite Question Peter Jensen in 1893 proposed that Armenian is the closest language to the Hittite language.

5. “Of these proto-Armenians, the most important branch were the Hittites. They established themselves in the heart of the Semitic territory and founded an empire which contented on equal terms with Egypt, and once extended its sway as far as the Aegean”.

The Old Eastern World – The New York Times

6. “So far as it is possible to infer from proper names, the language of the Hittites belonged to the same family of speech as the languages spoken by the Patiani (between the Orontes and the bay of Antioch), the Kilikians, Kuai, Samahlai, Gamgumai, Komagenians, Moschi and Tibareni, the proto-Armenians, and other tribes who occupied the country between the Caspian and the Halys on the one side, and Mesopotamia on the other. This family of speech has been conveniently termed Alarodian”.”

 There is a conceptual link between Haldi and Mher, a connection assumed by the traditional Armenian designation for the blind rock portal at Van, which the Armenians called ‘Door of Haldi’ at period of Van Kingdom. Turks call this place "Meher Kapısı"...(Mher's Door) Mher's Door ('Mheri Dur' in Armenian) - Mher remains entombed in Raven’s Rock since justice still doesn’t reign over the earth. Painting by Vagan Garibyan


There is a conceptual link between Haldi and Mher, a connection assumed by the traditional Armenian designation for the blind rock portal at Van, which the Armenians called ‘Door of Haldi’ at period of Van Kingdom.
Turks call this place “Meher Kapısı”…(Mher’s Door)
Mher’s Door (‘Mheri Dur’ in Armenian) – Mher remains entombed in Raven’s Rock since justice still doesn’t reign over the earth.
Painting by Vagan Garibyan
Transactions of Soc. Bib. Archaeology,” vii. 251. • Idem, 7ii. 276.

 Here it is some interesting information http://rbedrosian.com/Classic/Petrosyan/haldi.htm

Movses Khorenantsi, drawing his information from Mar Aba’s book, uses a distinctive expression for Hyek:”the Yapetostean Hayk”,i.e. having the nature of Yapetos-Hephaestus.Remembering that Hephaestus was a god of fire, such a characterization of Hyek appears to have taken place during the Hellenistic(Artashessian)period of Armenia when Hyek’s fiery nature was still remembered.

Personified as the eponymic ancestor of the Armenian people, Hyek is also described as having “very curly hair and sparkling eyes”,a description that was inspired by his fiery nature and paralleled with that given to Vahagn who, too “had hair of fire…and his eyes were two suns.”

 

In the old genealogical list preserved by Khorenatsi, Hyek is considered the son of Torgom. The origin of this name is linked with that of the city-land of Tarkuma/Tarhigama(some scholars locate this city in Hyeasa, but others who place it in the south-western regions of the Armenian Highland((see Tarkuma)), in Arme-Subaria, north of Syria(see Tarhigamani), seem to be more correct. In this connection, it might be right to point out the village of Derik, below Angel Tun-the birthplace of Angls or English, in the region of the sources of the Khabur, 40km west of Mardin.As we have seen before, Adad-Nirari-2 called this region Hark'((Harki)) which was in Armani as mentioned by Naram-Sin)mentioned in Hittite and Urartian inscriptions.

It must be recalled that Hyek is a deity, hence, he should have been considered the son of the god Tarku, the god Tork’ of Armenians, whose name is radical component of the city name of Tarkuma/Tarhigama.Tork’s main temple was in Aghtznik(Arme-Subaria), at the Armenian sacred city-fortress Angel-Tun(Ingalava?), now called Egil.

Among Armenians Tork ‘was also called Tork’Angel; Khorenatsi refers to him as Tork’of Angel, i.e.Tork’ of Angelian descent.In the Old Armenian translation of the Bible, the god of the Underworld, Nergal of the Semitic text, is translated as Angel(who probably corresponds also to the Sumerian Engur, the god of the Abyss).

Thus it becomes easier to understand why Hyek, the god of volcano(later attributed to Vahagn) is called “son of Torgom”, i.e. the son of Angelian Tork,’the god of the Underworld, because both the volcano and the god of volcano originate from the underworld forces.

The epic of Hyek’s fight against Bel (the Babylonian God) provides a substantial proof that Hyek and his people were already in existance in the land called Hark’, at the center of the Armenian-Nairian Highland, at the time when Bel was carrying out his raids, that is, when the mighty Assyro-Babylonian empire was seeking to expand; a proof which, unfortunately, has been overlooked by those who (wrongly) support the theory of migration of Armenian people from the Balkans.

These were the people of Haldi-Hyek, who, as the natives of their own highland, have fought long and bloody battles to protect their homeland against foreign invasions. Because of the fact that the Armenian Highland is situated at the crossroads of continents where different civilizations have met, foreign deities have penetrated into the land in later periods, and Hyek, the indigenous god of the land was raised to heaven as a star and identified with the constelation Orion.

As already pointed out, the most ancient and principal national deity of the Armenian people was the deity of the sun and fire. As time progressed, however, this great deity was divided in two, just as it had occurred in the case of his consort, the goddess Inanna-Anahit. His nature of fire and his nature of the sun began to be represented separately and by different names. Thus, in Urartian times, his character of fire was represented by the name Haldi, and that of the sun by the name Siwini.

In Armenia, after the fall of the Urartian dynasty, the name Mihr was given to this one great deity that embodied the powers of fire and the sun.

While utilizing the name Mihr for this great god, the Armenians have, nonetheless, pictured him, as in Urartian times, with a duality of nature, distinguishing between his characteristics of fire and the sun. This is why, in the epic of David of Sasun, the god of fire is called Great Mher, whereas the sun-god is Mher Junior. This shows that among Armenians the fire-god was considered ancestral or had seniority and preeminence over the sun-god, just as Hyek, the fire-god, was ancestral to and greater than Ara, the sun-god. Similarly, in Urartian times, the fire-god Haldi was considered greater and more important than the sun-god Siwini.

We think that much before the Achaemenians, in the times of Mitani, the name Mihr was already known to the people, particularly to those living in the regions of Mitani or Armani-Subari (and later Arme-Subria) where Sasun is located, in the form of Mitra (or perhaps even as Mher). Otherwise, it would not have been so readily accepted by the people during the Achaemenian period or later.

That Great Mher represented Haldi is evidenced by the fact that he was called ‘the lion-like Mher’, reminding us of Haldi’s representations in Urartian wall paintings where he is pictured on a lion. Furthermore, Mher’s wife was called Armahan, a name which appears to be a distortion of Aruban(i), the name of Haldi’s wife.

It is known that the crow was a symbol of the sun and fire; “its feathers were black because they were charred by it”. Mher Junior had inherited Great Mher’s position; consequently, he had held, in his turn, the position of the great Urartian gods or preserved in him their memory. “According to a tradition, Mher, disillusioned with all the injustice in the world, had cloistered himself in a cave called Agravak’ar (Crow’s Stone) in Van.”

We already know that on a cliff called Mheri Dur (Mher’s Gate’) in Van, there is a large inscription written by Ishpuini and Menua, which lists the names of all the Urartian gods. All these show that at a time when it was even forgotten that these inscriptions represented actual writings, the Armenian tradition has preserved in Mher (particularly in the term Agriavak’ar) the memory of the great Urartian gods.

According to a legend, every year, at the feast of Ascention and the night of Vartavar (a water festival), when heaven and earth kiss each other, Mher comes out (from his cave) with a horse of fire, circles the heaven and the earth, and seeing that ‘the earth cannot yet support his weight’ returns to his seclusion. One day in the future, Mher shall come out from his hiding place to deliver ‘Armenian world’ from wicked forces and to establish a happy kingdom.

In the epic of David of Sasun, after the death of the king of Mser, his young and beautiful widow Ismil Khatun sends word to Great Mher in Sasun, bidding him to come and marry her and posses the land of Mser, even though Mher already has his own wife Armaghan.

This legend reminds us of a similar episode in the epic of Ara and Shamiram, where Shamiram, likewise, after the death of her husband Ninos, sends a herald to Ara in Armenia, inviting him to become her husband and to rule over Ninevah and the entire kingdom, even though Ara, too, has his own wife Nuard.

Thus, we see striking similarities not only between the two stories where Ismil Khatun and Shamiram, each in her turn, feel a passion for and make propositions to Mher and Ara, respectively, but also between the very names Ismil and Shamir(am) and also between the mane of Mher’s wife Armaghan and that of Haldi’s wife Aruban(i). In the section on Astuas, we had arrived at the Ara=Ardi=Aldi (Haldi) equation; now we can add another one to it: the Mher=Haldi mythological connection.

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