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Egypt or Babylon? Where did the world turn upside down? The meaning and the use of Hexagram got changed

April 12, 2017

Many people today associate the six pointed star (Hexagram) with the Jewish Star of David (Magen David), as it is the modern symbol of Jewish identity and Judaism but its usage as a symbol of the Jewish community dates to the 17th century (officially), thus originally it is not  a Jewish symbol.

Six-pointed Stars have been found all over the world.

In mathematics, the root system for the simple Lie group G2 is in the form of a hexagram, with six long roots and six short roots.

In mathematics, the root system for the simple Lie group G2 is in the form of a hexagram, with six long roots and six short roots.

The symbol was actually ‘given’ to rabbinic leaders in the 14th century by King Charles IV of Bohemia and formally adopted as ‘the Star of David’ in 1898 at the Second Zionist Congress in Switzerland.

It is possible that as a simple geometric shape, like for example the triangle, circle, or square, the Hexagram has been created by various peoples with no connection to one another but it is also possible that the knowledge of galaxy was spread from one direction.

Six-pointed stars have also been found in cosmological diagrams in Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism. The reasons behind this symbol’s common appearance in Indic religions and the West are unknown. One possibility is that they have a common origin. The other possibility is that artists and religious people from several cultures independently created the hexagram shape, which is a relatively simple geometric design.

Anahata (also known as Anahata-puri, or Padma-sundara) is symbolized by a lotus flower with twelve petals

Anahata (also known as Anahata-puri, or Padma-sundara) is symbolized by a lotus flower with twelve petals

Within Indic lore, the shape is generally understood to consist of two triangles—one pointed up and the other down—locked in harmonious embrace. The two components are called “Om” and the “Hrim” in Sanskrit, and symbolize man’s position between earth and sky. The downward triangle symbolizes Shatki, the sacred embodiment of femininity, and the upward triangle symbolizes Shiva, or Agni Tattva, representing the focused aspects of masculinity.

Diagram showing the two mystic syllables Om and Hrim

Diagram showing the two mystic syllables Om and Hrim

In Buddhism, some old versions of the Bardo Thodol, also known as the “Tibetan Book of the Dead“, contain a hexagram with a Swastika inside. It was made up by the publishers for this particular publication. In Tibetan, it is called the “origin of phenomenon” (chos-kyi ‘byung-gnas). It is especially connected with Vajrayogini, and forms the center part of Her mandala. In reality, it is in three dimensions, not two, although it may be portrayed either way.

Many Western occultists associate this central chakra with the central Sephirah, Tiphereth, in the kabbalistic tree of life. Christian kabbalists in particular associate this sephirah with love, healing, and knowledge.

Hexagram at Humayun's Tomb, Delhi, India

Hexagram at Humayun’s Tomb, Delhi, India

The Shatkona is a symbol used in Hindu Yantra that represents the union of both the male and feminine form. More specifically it is supposed to represent Purusha (the supreme being), and Prakriti (mother nature, or causal matter). Often this is represented as Shiva – Shakti.

The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia declares that the SIX-POINTED STA, according to the Rosicrucian, was known to the ancient Egyptians. The SIX TRIANGLES is the Egyptian hieroglyphic for the “Land of the Spirits”. In the Astro-Mythology of the Egyptians, we find belief in the first man-god (Horus I) and his death and resurrection as Amsu. The six-pointed star was the first sign or hieroglyphic of Amsu. Amsu – the risen Horus – was the first man-god risen in spiritual form.

unicursal hexagram Alchemy ancient Egypt

Unicursal Hexagram, Alchemy, ancient Egypt

A Jewish scholar, Prof. Scholem, who was a researcher of Kabbalah and Jewish mysticism and one of the founders of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, conducted a 50-year study of the history of the Star of David. He published a short summary of the study in 1949, shortly after the symbol was chosen to appear on the new state’s national flag where he stated: “The Magen David is not a Jewish symbol, and therefore not the ‘symbol of Judaism’.

All in all it goes to the king of Solomon who was pagan, btw  he fell deeply into idolatry because he was unduly influenced by his pagan wives.

The Encyclopædia Britannica identifies the six-pointed star as a ‘magical sign’ … a protection against evil spirits … It is only in Jewish sources that the interlaced triangles are called ‘Shield of David’, as non-Jewish sources call the symbol, the ‘Seal of Solomon’. What Solomon left behind was not only the division of the twelve tribes of Israel, but evidence of his idolatry. His foreign wives led him into the worship of the goddess Astoreth (Astgh in Armenian, which means a star and it is a common female name in Armenia (my addition)), otherwise called ‘Astarte’ (meaning ‘star’). The six-pointed star, or Hexagram, which came to be called the ‘Seal of Solomon’ when King Solomon took it upon himself, was the chief article of this pagan worship.” [Ibid., p. 21-22].

But who were the foreign wives of King Solomon and from where they came noone knows. Anyway, they were the ones who changed the wheel of history and they were the ones who brought pagan teachings to Babylon. And it was in Babylon where the meaning of hexagram got completely changed when the people of magic dipped their practices into it and when the knowledge of galaxy  – a system of billions of stars gathered by mutual gravitation got used to rule the world. 

There are sources which prove that the Armenians used the symbol 1000 years before the Egyptians.

The usage of hexagram in Armenian science, art, architecture, decorations and even for religious purposes has been extensive throughout the history.

excavated in Ashtarak (Nerkin Naver) burial (3rd millenium BC., Armenia)

Excavated in Ashtarak (Nerkin Naver) burial (3rd millenium BC., Armenia)

The oldest known depiction of a six pointed star (dating back to the 3rd millennium BC.) was excavated in the Ashtarak burial mound in “Nerkin Naver” in Armenia. This was confirmed by a series of radiocarbon analysis of artifacts, conducted in laboratories in Germany and in the USA. The handle of a dagger depicts the worlds earliest decoration of a six-pointed star buried in a burial mound containing over 500 graves.

Armenians were skilled mathematicians, architects and craftsmen. In ancient times the Armenians had a refined knowledge of astronomy and were able to predict astral events. The observatory at Metsamor allowed ancestral Armenians to develop geometry to such a level they could measure distances, latitudes and longitudes, envision the world as round, and were predicting solar and lunar eclipses about 1000 years before the Egyptians began doing the same.

Armenian architecture is often geometrically sound with straight lines connecting columns and mathematical precision. The geometry of the Armenian architecture has stood the test of time by preserving many ancient buildings in a region dominated by war, poverty and natural disasters.

Floor plan of a Medieval Armenian Church of the Shepherd

Floor plan of a Medieval Armenian Church of the Shepherd

The fortress cities and temples that have been excavated in Armenia (some going back as far as 7000 years) show awareness of using geometry in constructing sacred buildings, using a complex system of squares, rectangles, circles, polygons with intersecting patterns.

Among many symbols Armenians used the six pointed star for architectural purposes.

Early Armenians believed the symbol had magical powers and incorporated it in architecture, astronomy and sacred art. Attesting to that there are numerous Armenian churches constructed in the shape of a six pointed star, they also use hexagrams to support the dome or simply as sacred decoration protecting the Church like magic charms.

The dome of Khorakert Monastery (12th c. AD), Armenia

The dome of Khorakert Monastery (12th c. AD), Armenia

The first Sanctuary of Seven Deities in Metsamor. Not far from the sanctuary, in accord with petroglyphs of telescopic Small Hillock and astronomical calculations, 2800-2600yy., BC. from this point the origin of Sirius has been observed, which that time coincided with Navasard- New Year (August 11).

The first Sanctuary of Seven Deities in Metsamor. Not far from the sanctuary, in accord with petroglyphs of telescopic Small Hillock and astronomical calculations, 2800-2600yy., BC. from this point the origin of Sirius has been observed.

 

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One Comment
  1. David Moore permalink

    Thank you.

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